Bainbridge

t2010-5705-sample

Regular price
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Bainbridge
Bainbridge
Bainbridge
Bainbridge
Bainbridge
Bainbridge
Bainbridge
Bainbridge
Bainbridge
Bainbridge
Bainbridge


Uses

Beautiful as drapery as well as duvet covers, clothes - lots of uses. Now Bainbridge is a semi-sheer, so you might need an underlayment fabric from some uses. Try our muslin, Astoria, Asotin, sateen – lots of choices.

Specifications

  • care: Although Bainbridge can be washed in cool water and line dried, professional green cleaning is recommended to maintain its crisp appearance. If washed, iron while still damp; because, if you wait until the linen is completely dry, linen is really hard to iron. If it does get dry, spritz with water – with distilled water (If there are minerals in your tap water, those minerals may stain).
  • certification: GOTS (The Global Organic Textile Standard)
  • content: 100% organic linen
  • railroaded:

    Yes**

  • weight: 6.2 oz yd2 / 210 gm m2
  • width: 54" / 137 cm

    * Most mills "cottonize" the linen fibers in order to spin and weave on cotton equipment. Cotton and synthetics spinning machines and looms are not terribly strong machines; full length linen fibers will tear them apart. Cottonizing means chopping the linen fibers to 2-inch lengths to spin. The longest fiber cotton is less than 2 inches long. Linen fibers (high quality) average multiple in length. Much harder to manage and much more expensive to use. But worth it as the single most important determinant of the quality, durability, etc. of your linen final fabric is the average length of the fibers spun into the yarn. (This is true for any fiber, not just linen; the length of the fibers spun into the yarn is the major determinant of the quality of the yarn and fabric.). That's when you get that linen sheen to die for after years of use. And stunning durability. Well cared for linen will last hundreds of years with regular, continual use.

    ** What is railroaded fabric?

Why choose us?

We've done the work for you

Over the years, Patty and Leigh Anne dedicated tons of time researching ethical and sustainable production—how it’s done, and what the implications are to us (and to all living things)  and to our planet.  They even put it in their mission statement, a goal “to change the way textiles are being made” – kind of a reach for such an upstart little company, right?