Bingen

5700-1

Regular price
/

Driftwood
Driftwood
Coffee

Uses:

upholstery

Specifications:

  • abrasion test results: 15,000 Martindale
  • certification: Oeko-Tex 100 Certified
  • content: 100% undyed, non-mulesed wool
  • weight: 14.0 oz yd2 / 520 gm m2
  • width: 54" / 148 cm

Care:

Professional green cleaning is a better idea for this wool. If you must DIY wash, hand wash in cool temperatures; Shrinks 15% the first time you wash, even in cool temperatures

About:

Bingen is a soft, lightweight yet thick, undyed wool for upholstery, drapery (hey, reduce your energy bill!), blankets, coats, dresses, suits, capes, hats, scarves.

Eco Facts:

As with all our wool fabrics, they are non-mulesed. What is mulesing and why would I want to insist on non-mulesed wool? One of the animal husbandry issues unique to sheep is the practice of mulesing. Sheep which are raised in certain climates (as much of Australia) are susceptible to a condition called "fly-strike." What is fly-strike? A certain type of fly, called blow flies, lay eggs on sheep's back legs when the sheep are less than clean. When the flies hatch, these maggots burrow in any slightly raw or inflamed area and literally eat their victim alive. To control this condition herders "mules" the sheep, which means cutting away large swaths of the skin on their hindquarters and back legs that is susceptible to the borrowing maggots. Mulesing is traditionally done without anesthetics, and is inhumane. Our wool is from tiny ranchers in Uruguay, who have never needed to mules sheep as fly-strike is unknown in Central and South America. 

Another note about wool
It came as a real revelation to this city girl that large grazing animals are a vital and necessary part of the solution to climate change. Sheep can actually help to improve soils, which improves the soil's ability to absorb water and maintain its original nutrient balance —and most importantly, by increasing the organic matter in the soil, it makes the soil a highly effective carbon bank. It's a complicated situation and we invite you to read more and comment on our blog: oecotextiles.wordpress.com/?s=wool

The Fabric Name:

If you're a kite surfer or windsurfer, you know Bingen. In the heart of the Columbia River Gorge, Bingen is a town just east of Vancouver, Washington. Home to a unique geological wonder called "Coyote Wall", a steep massive basalt cliff, rising to 1,800 feet.


 

What is non-mulesed wool?
As with all our wool fabrics, they are non-mulesed. One of the animal husbandry issues unique to sheep is the practice of mulesing. Sheep which are raised in certain climates (as much of Australia) are susceptible to a condition called “fly-strike.” What is fly-strike? A certain type of fly, called blow flies, lay eggs on sheep’s back legs when the sheep are less than clean. When the flies hatch, these maggots burrow in any slightly raw or inflamed area and literally eat their victim alive. To control this condition herders “mules” the sheep, which means cutting away large swaths of the skin on their hindquarters and back legs that is susceptible to the borrowing maggots. Mulesing is traditionally done without anesthetics, and is inhumane. Our wool is from tiny ranchers in Uruguay, who have never needed to mules sheep as fly-strike is unknown in Central and South America.

Another note about wool

It came as a real revelation to this city girl that large grazing animals are a vital and necessary part of the solution to climate change.   Sheep can actually help to improve soils, which improves the soil’s ability to absorb water and maintain its original nutrient balance – and most importantly, by increasing the organic matter in the soil, it makes the soil a highly effective carbon bank.  It’s a complicated situation and we invite you to read more – and comment on our blog:  https://oecotextiles.wordpress.com/?s=wool

Uses

Upholstery, drapery (hey, reduce your energy bill!), blankets, coats, dresses, suits, capes, hats, scarves.

Why choose us?

We've done the work for you

Over the years, Patty and Leigh Anne dedicated tons of time researching ethical and sustainable production—how it’s done, and what the implications are to us (and to all living things)  and to our planet.  They even put it in their mission statement, a goal “to change the way textiles are being made” – kind of a reach for such an upstart little company, right?